When you need Him fast…


Emergency Bible Numbers

– When you are sad, call on John 14

– When you don’t feel loved, call on Romans 8:38-39

– When you have sinned, call on 1 John 1:8-9

– When you are facing danger, call on Psalm 91

– When people have failed you, call on Psalm 27

– When God feel far from you, call on Psalm 139

– When your faith needs encouraging, call on Hebrews 11

– When you are scared, call on Psalm 23

– When you are worried, call on Matthew 6:25-34

– When you are hurt, call on Colossians 3:12-17

– When you feel no one is on your side, call on Romans 8:31-39

– When you are seeking rest, call on Matthew 11:25-30

– When you are suffering, call on Romans 8:18-30

– When you feel you’re failing, call on Psalm 121

– When you pray, call on Matthew 6:9-13

– When you need courage, call on Joshua 1

– When you are in need, call on Philippians 4:19

– When you are hated because of your faith, call on John 15

– When you are losing hope, call on 2 Thessalonians 2:16-17

– When you are seeking peace, call on John 14:27

– When you want to do good works, call on John 15

– When you want to live a happy life, call on Colossians 3:12-17

– When you don’t understand what God is doing, call on Isaiah 55:8-9

– When you want to get along with others, call on Romans 12:9-21

from http://biblestudyplanet.com/emergency-bible-numbers/

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Updating my blog for MLK Day!


Well, as part of my promise to myself to update my blogs, and since Darren is home because of MLK day today, I am not going to come up with anything original. I am just going to re-type an entry from a book I got at the Scholastic Book Fair.

Happy MLK Day, Y’all!

 

Civil Rights Time-Line

from Everything You Need to Know: The Answer Book for School Survival

from Scholastic Book Clubs, Scholastic, Inc

With the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves. But just because African-Americans were officially free it didn’t mean they had equal rights. Here are some of the important events in the struggle for civil rights since Emancipation:

1868:    The Fourteenth Amendment declares rights to all Americans

1870:    The Fifteenth Amendment declares the right to vote to all male citizens.

1896:    In Plessy vs. Ferguson, the Supreme Court upholds segregation declaring that facilities can be kept “separate” as long as they are “equal”

1909:    Riots in Springfield, Illinois, lead both black and white intellectuals to form the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

1939:    When the Daughters of the American Revolution refuse to allow Marian Anderson into Constitution Hall, she draws a croed of 75,000 singing at the Lincoln Memorial.

1942:     The interracial Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) is founded in New York City.

1947:    Jackie Robinson becomes the first black player in major league baseball.

1545:     In Brown vs. Board of Education, the Supreme Court bans segregation in public schools.

1955:    In Montgomery, Alabama, Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat to a white person; her action leads to the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 to 1956, and to the desegregation of Montgomery buses in 1956.

1957:    Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas tries to block the entry of nine black students to Central High School in Little Rock; President Eisenhower calls in 1,000 paratroopers to restore order.

1960:     Afro-American college students insist on being served at an all white Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina; their action launches the “sit-in” protest movement across the country.

1961:    In “Freedom Rides” sponsored by CORE, groups of black and white people test desegregation by riding together on buses through the south.

1963:    Police arrest a group of ministers, including Martin Luther King, Jr., for demonstrating in Birmingham, Alabamam. He gives his stirring speech, “I Have a Dream,” at the March on Washington.

1964:    The march from Selma to Montgomery, led by Martin Luther King, Jr., leads to the passage of the Voting Rights Act. Black leader Malcolm X is murdered.

1968:    The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., is murdered in Memphis, Tennessee, leading to a week of riots in 125 cities.

1978:     Seattle desegregates its schools, becoming the largest U.S. city to do so without a court order.

Celebrate Every Day!


Everyone like to celebrate! Here is a list of things that can be celebrated each day of the month!

Maybe you can use them for a mini unit study or a writing prompt, but since they came from About.com, they might even have some worksheets or coloring sheets you can use. I haven’t checked them all out, but I used to use About .com to get cool worksheets as add-ons for my lessons.

 

http://homeschooling.about.com/cs/unitssubjhol/a/fundaysjan.htm?nl=1

January 1 – New Year, Z Day and Betsy Ross

January 2 – Georgia, Speed Limit and Trade

January 3 – First Ladies, Alaska and Drinking Straws

January 4 – Utah, Isaac Newton and Spaghetti

January 5 – Birds, Peanuts and Bridges

January 6

January 7

January 8

January 9

January 10

January 11

January 12

January 13

January 14

January 15

January 16

January 17

January 18

January 19

January 20

January 21

January 22

January 23

January 24

January 25

January 26

January 27

January 28

January 29

January 30

January 31

National Health Month
National Oatmeal Month

Aprons Again


I am thinking about making some simple aprons to go along with some of my “Goodies in a Jar” that I am making for my family for Christmas. I was thinking about printing this poem on some cool paper to include, too! What do you think? I am very open to suggestions!

The History of ‘APRONS’ I don’t think our kids know what an apron is. The principal use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few.

It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and… aprons used less material. But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.. And when the weather was cold grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove. Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folks knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.

REMEMBER: Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw. They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

I don’t think I ever caught anything from an apron – but love…

Vikings — History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts


Vikings — History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts.

We are studying The Vikings in World History this week. I am so happy to FINALLY be in the Middle Ages! Anyone have any other resources on Vikings or Middle/Dark Ages?

We are creating a MASSIVE time-line book as our final project. So far we are about to overflow a 3-inch binder. This is not just the line with little icons & dates. Agnes has been doing research on various people and events, creating “profiles”, writing original stories, and adding artistic projects to this book! I imagine we will need a few more binders by the time we get to the modern times… pictures to come!

Homeschool Info


 

 

I got this e-mail from my IDEA Field Rep.

Hope it helps some of the Fairbanks/ North Pole area homeschoolers!

 

Homeschool Co-Op

November Homeschool Co-op Meeting

Tuesday, November 9th, 1-3 pm

 

We meet at Valley of Blessing Church on the corner of Airport and Market (3007 Airport Way).

 

We will be celebrating Thanksgiving, practicing Christmas carols to go caroling at the Pioneer Home in December, and sharing what Thanksgiving means to each of us.  Come for crafts, snacks, games, and new friends!

 

We hope you can join us!  All homeschoolers are welcome!

 

For more information or to RSVP, please contact Amy Temple at akteachermom@yahoo.com or Joyce Plummer at bobnjoyce97@yahoo.com by Monday, 11/8.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 

The Region F listserv is provided to promote homeschool-related communication between IDEA families. The content is provided by families and other interested parties.  Posting by IDEA does not imply IDEA endorsement or recommendation.  Activities mentioned are not sponsored by IDEA, however are open to all homeschoolers.  To have your message forwarded to the list, simply address it to sandy.blewett@ideafamilies.org Write to the same address to be removed from this list. Thank you!

Photo Bible Cards




Ephesians 4:2,3

Originally uploaded by pandjmorris

This is a wonderful collection I found, thanks to The Money Saving Mom!
http://moneysavingmom.com/2010/10/free-scripture-verse-card-downloads.html
Thank you and God Bless you both!

Free Homemade Gift Ideas. Instructions for Easy Homemade Gifts to Make


 

Free Homemade Gift Ideas. Instructions for Easy Homemade Gifts to Make

 

I love to make special gifts for special people, so it probably not a surprise that I like this site!

EclipseCrossword – the fast, easy, and FREE way to create crossword puzzles in minutes


EclipseCrossword – the fast, easy, and FREE way to create crossword puzzles in minutes.

This is such a cool tool! I think I am going to have to make all Agnes’ vocab lists into crossword puzzles! Ok, maybe not all her vocab lists will become crosswords, but some of them will! What a cool way to test spelling, etc.!

We need an Apron (From a friend’s facbook status)


The History of ‘APRONS’

I don’t think our kids know what an apron is.

The principal use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few.

It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and… aprons used less material. But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.. And when the weather was cold grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove. Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls. In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men folks knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.

REMEMBER: Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw. They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

I don’t think I ever caught anything from an apron – but love…

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